How to Overcome a Poverty Mindset

MakeItUltra™

By Eric Charles, MA., PhD-c


“Poverty is a state of mind.” ~Rahul Gandhi 

Do you ever catch yourself passing on joyous opportunities because you feel it will be too expensive? Do you second guess yourself before or after making purchases? If so, you may be experiencing symptoms of a poverty mindset. It is important to differentiate between actual poverty and refusing to experience life more abundantly. Research suggests that 80% of the world lives on $10 per day. At least 1.1 billion people in developing countries do not have access to water and some 1.2 billion people worldwide do not have access to electricity. If you have water and electricity, chances are you are not living in extreme poverty. And, if you are not living in extreme poverty, chances are you can afford to treat yourself, at least some of the time.

Here are some ways to overcome a poverty…

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World-first synthesis of globalization effects on people and planet: International trade benefitting the rich, outsourcing social and environmental impacts

Researchers have compiled a world-first conclusive synthesis of the environmental and social impacts of globalization — using sophisticated computation to provide a bird’s eye view of the displacement of wealth-driven consumption into offshore production — highlighting effects such as child labor. The research reveals the extent developed countries are outsourcing burdensome production to poor countries and points towards a need for consumption-based accounting — where a country’s environmental score includes its imports — leaving no room for loopholes.

Australian researchers have compiled a world-first conclusive synthesis of the environmental and social impacts of globalisation — using sophisticated computation to provide a bird’s eye view of the displacement of wealth-driven consumption into offshore production — highlighting effects such as increased child labour and environmental degradation at the area of production that may not be seen easily but can have far-reaching consequences.

Drawing on an increasingly large pool of data — a substantial part of which underpins important relationships initially discovered by the University of Sydney’s Integrated Sustainability Analysis (ISA) team — the study for the first time unveils the extent to which developed countries are outsourcing environmentally and socially burdensome production to poor countries.

Technological advances in footprinting, otherwise referred to as consumption-based accounting, are led by ISA and a handful of organisations globally. The research is set to complement the current production-based focus by closing accounting loopholes.

This new overview study, conducted at the University of Sydney and UNSW Sydney, shows that overall about a third of environmental and social impacts from consumption in wealthy nations is displaced to developing countries, and this trend in outsourcing responsibility is increasing.

The findings are published today in the leading journal Nature Geoscience.

University of Sydney Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) Professor Duncan Ivison, said the important work could play a role in helping achieve some of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

“This important and ground-breaking area of research being developed by our world-leading Integrated Sustainability Analysis group is a perfect example of the social impact that researchers can have,” Professor Ivison said.

Co-author Professor Manfred Lenzen, who heads ISA from Sydney’s School of Physics, said that social impacts were a relatively new area of research, but findings painted a global picture of masters and servants. “Many citizens of rich countries require the work of up to five poor people to satisfy their consumption,” Professor Lenzen said.

“Rich consumers like us are implicated in pollution and inequality all over the world, and people in poor countries bear the brunt of our large environmental and social footprints.”

Associate Professor Tommy Wiedmann, the study’s lead researcher from UNSW Sydney and ISA, said indirect effects facilitated by often complicated supply-chains were mostly hidden from consumers, who generally do not know where the raw ingredients of their purchases stem from.

“Carbon emissions are still accounted for on a territorial basis,” explained Associate Professor Wiedmann.

“This means that if a country moves from producing goods domestically to importing them from China, its carbon footprint decreases — leading politicians to think that the country is cleaning up its act.”

Such a convenient myth was debunked when Associate Professor Wiedmann, then with the Stockholm Environment Institute, and Professor Lenzen, were involved in a study to establish the UK’s carbon footprint, prompting the BBC to declare the UK ‘in delusion’ over its emissions, and forcing the UK’s Environment Minister to explain earlier statements praising the country’s decarbonisation.

Professor Lenzen concluded: “Our new research clearly points towards a need for so-called consumption-based accounting — where a country’s environmental score includes its imports — and as such leaves no room for loopholes.”

The synthesis paper, published today, includes:

  • Employment — Masters v Servants: For each Swiss person, three people work elsewhere to support their lifestyles. In Madagascar, 7 in 10 locals work full-time to produce exports for affluent people.
  • Air pollution: An increase in health impacts in China come from air pollution linked to production for people in the United States.
  • Water scarcity: Almost 80 percent of the EU’s consumption of scarce water occurs outside its borders, with the largest pressure exerted in the stressed Indus Delta straddling Pakistan and India.
  • Biodiversity: US consumption exerts threats to marine life in Southeast Asia; and biodiversity in southern Brazil — such as deforestation of the Amazon for soy production.
  • Resources: Outsourcing to developing countries has meant most developed countries did not need to improve resource productivity in the past few decades.
  • Child labour: In 2011/2012, almost 1 million children in India worked for exports alone.
  • Safety: Per 100,000 workers in global supply chains, occupational health and safety incidents lead to the loss of US$2 million, 27,000 working days, 4,800 injuries and 12 deaths per year.
  • Inequality: Many developed countries exhibit a large inequality footprint because their imports stem from production with highly unequal wages, gender inequality and corruption.

Source: World-first synthesis of globalization effects on people and planet: International trade benefitting the rich, outsourcing social and environmental impacts

Toxic Chemicals Database — Chemical Free Life

Free, searchable, online database of information about the dangers of toxic substances in products and the environment A necessary tool for consumers, researchers, attorneys, clinicians, nonprofit organizations, journalists, policymakers and others working to minimize the adverse effects of toxic chemicals in our world. http://www.ToxicDocs.org Free online access to millions of documents on chemical toxicity made […]

via Toxic Chemicals Database — Chemical Free Life

Introduction to Evolutionary Algorithms — Towards Data Science – Medium

Optimization by natural selectionEvolutionary algorithms are a heuristic-based approach to solving problems that cannot be easily solved in polynomial time, such as classically NP-Hard problems, and anything else that would take far too long to exhaustively process. When used on their own, they are typically applied to combinatorial problems; however, genetic algorithms are often used…

via Introduction to Evolutionary Algorithms — Towards Data Science – Medium

How Tamil Nadu became one of the world’s leading renewable energy markets — Quartz

The southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu is one of the top nine markets globally to have achieved an exceptionally large share of renewable power generation, according to a report by US-based think-tank Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA). The IEEFA studied the top 15 countries or power markets worldwide by their share…

via How Tamil Nadu became one of the world’s leading renewable energy markets — Quartz

Daily Thirukkural : Kural #122

தமிழ் :

122 – காக்க பொருளா அடக்கத்தை ஆக்கம்

அதனினூஉங் கில்லை உயிர்க்கு.

விளக்கம்:

மிக்க உறுதியுடன் காக்கப்படவேண்டியது அடக்கமாகும். அடக்கத்தைவிட ஆக்கம் தரக் கூடியது வேறொன்றும் இல்லை.


English:

122 – Guard thou as wealth the power of self-control;
Than this no greater gain to living soul!


Explanation:

Let self-control be guarded as a treasure; there is no greater source of good for man than that.

daily kural thirukural 122

 

courtesy : Thirukural Explanation by Kalaignar M Karunanidhi
English Translation  by Rev Dr G U Pope, Rev W H Drew, Rev John Lazarus and Mr F W Ellis

A prediction for globalization in 2018

We recently forecast that 2018 will be a bumper year for M&A and IPO deals, thanks to improved global demand, continued momentum in stock markets and an uptick in global trade. The big risks to this outlook include unpredictable US trade policy, problems in the US bond market and a dip in China’s economic growth.

via A prediction for globalization in 2018 — Encourage Self-Study